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What Defiles a Man


Then came together unto him the Pharisees, and certain of the scribes, which came from Jerusalem. (Mark:7:1)


Pharisees — a separatist that is exclusively religious; a Pharisaean that is Jewish sectary: — Pharisee.

Scribes — a writer that is (professionally) scribe or secretary: — scribe town-clerk.


And when they saw some of his disciples eat bread with defiled, that is to say, with unwashen, hands, they found fault. (Mark:7:2)


For the Pharisees, and all the Jews, except they wash their hands oft, eat not, holding the tradition of the elders. (Mark:7:3)


And when they come from the market, except they wash, they eat not. And many other things there be, which they have received to hold, as the washing of cups, and pots, brasen vessels, and of tables. (Mark:7:4)


Then the Pharisees and scribes asked him, Why walk not thy disciples according to the tradition of the elders, but eat bread with unwashen hands? (Mark:7:5)


He answered and said unto them, Well hath Esaias prophesied of you hypocrites, as it is written, This people honoureth me with their lips, but their heart is far from me. (Mark:7:6)


Esaias — Of Hebrew origin; Jah has saved; Hesaias (that is Jeshajah) an Israelite.


Howbeit in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men. (Mark:7:7)


For laying aside the commandment of God, ye hold the commandment of men, as the washing of pots and cups: and many other such like things ye do. (Mark:7:8)


And he said unto them, Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. (Mark:7:9)


For Moses said, Honour thy father and thy mother; and, Whoso curseth father or mother, let him die the death: (Mark:7:10)


But ye say, If a man shall say to his father or mother, It is Corban, that is to say, a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; he shall be free; (Mark:7:11)


Corban — Of Hebrew and Chaldee origin respectively; something brought near the {altar} that {is} a sacrificial present: — {oblation} that is {offered} offering; a votive offering and the offering; a consecrated present (to the Temple fund); by extension (the latter term) the Treasury itself that is the room where the contribution boxes stood: — Corban treasury.


The word, “Corban,” looks like it’s spelled with a capital “c” for no apparent reason. I say that because, in the King James Version of the Holy Bible, instead of placing quotation marks before and after a quote, the authors, “Capitalize” the first letter after a comma after writing that something was said.


Example:


In the phrase, “But ye say, If a man shall say,” the “i” in “if” is capitalized only because, before the comma it reads, ye say.


Another example:


Then the Pharisees and scribes asked him, Why walk not thy disciples.


In the phrase, “Then the Pharisees and scribes asked him, Why walk not thy disciples,” the “w” is capitalized, only because, scribes asked him, Why walk not….


Because the meaning of the word, “Corban” is; a sacrifice or offering to God among the ancient Hebrews, it’s safe to say that the word corban, in the Gospel of Mark chapter seven verse eleven, is spelled with a capital “c” for no apparent reason.


Since the word, “Corban” is spelled with a capital letter for no apparent reason, it should be understood as the “Spirit” of.


That being the case, in the phrase, “If a man shall say to his father or mother, It is Corban, that is to say, a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; he shall be free,” corban is an “Unclean or Evil,” spirited thing!


By saying you will give to the church, instead of giving to your father or mother, you dishonor your parents: Not good.


And ye suffer him no more to do ought for his father or his mother; (Mark:7:12)


Ought — not even one (man woman or thing) that is none; nobody nothing: — any (man) aught man neither any (thing) never (man) no (man) none (+ of these things) not (any at all -thing) naught.


Making the word of God of none effect through your tradition, which ye have delivered: and many such like things do ye. (Mark:7:13)


And when he had called all the people unto him, he said unto them, Hearken unto me every one of you, and understand: (Mark:7:14)


There is nothing from without a man, that entering into him can defile him: but the things which come out of him, those are they that defile the man. (Mark:7:15)


Defile — to make (or consider) profane (ceremonially): — call common defile pollute unclean.


If any man have ears to hear, let him hear. (Mark:7:16)


And when he was entered into the house from the people, his disciples asked him concerning the parable. (Mark:7:17)


Parable — a similitude (parable) that is (symbolically) fictitious narrative (of common life conveying a moral) apothegm or adage: — comparison figure parable proverb.


And he saith unto them, Are ye so without understanding also? Do ye not perceive, that whatsoever thing from without entereth into the man, it cannot defile him; (Mark:7:18)


Without Understanding - unintelligent; by implication wicked: — foolish without understanding.


Because it entereth not into his heart, but into the belly, and goeth out into the draught, purging all meats? (Mark:7:19)


And he said, That which cometh out of the man, that defileth the man. (Mark:7:20)


For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed evil thoughts, adulteries, fornications, murders, (Mark:7:21)


Thefts, covetousness, wickedness, deceit, lasciviousness, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, foolishness: (Mark:7:22)


All these evil things come from within, and defile the man. (Mark:7:23)


Old Testament:


And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. (Genesis:6:5)


Matthew


Then came to Jesus scribes and Pharisees, which were of Jerusalem, saying, (Matthew:15:1)


Why do thy disciples transgress the tradition of the elders? for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. (Matthew:15:2)


Transgress — to go contrary to that is violate a command: — (by) transgress (-ion).


In the Gospel of Mark:


Then the Pharisees and scribes asked him, Why walk not thy disciples according to the tradition of the elders, but eat bread with unwashen hands? (Mark:7:5)


The way verse two chapter fifteen of the Gospel of Matthew is written, using the word, “Transgress,” it puts the audience in a totally different mindset or “Mood.”


But he answered and said unto them, Why do ye also transgress the commandment of God by your tradition? (Matthew:15:3)


Whenever the author of the Gospel of Matthew, “Alters” something that the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, it is, more often, than not, something that the character Jesus, probably said and/or did.


The author of the Gospel of Mark is communicating from a “New Testament Spiritual Understanding,” whereas, the author of the Gospel of Matthew is more interested in and wants to, “Clearly Emphasize,” Old Testament, Jewish, Mosaic law and Fleshly type language!


For instance, the question in the Gospel of Mark, “Why walk not thy disciples according to the tradition of the elders?


Then, the same question in the Gospel of Matthew, “Why do thy disciples, “Transgress” the tradition of the elders?”


The word “Transgress” is only found in the Gospel of Matthew and the letter to the Romans, in the New Testament, but in seven books of the Old Testament.


For God commanded, saying, Honour thy father and mother: and, He that curseth father or mother, let him die the death. (Matthew:15:4)


Old Testament:


Honor thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee. (Exodus:20:12)


And he that curseth his father, or his mother, shall surely be put to death. (Exodus:21:17)


By using the word, “Commanded” and putting a verse from the Book of Exodus chapter twenty, together with a verse from the Book of Exodus chapter twenty-one, divided by a colon, (:) instead of a simi-colon (;) and a comma, (,) the author of the Gospel of Matthew made what the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, much more “Menacing.”


In the Gospel of Mark:


For Moses said, Honour thy father and thy mother; and, Whoso curseth father or mother, let him die the death: (Mark:7:10)


But ye say, Whosoever shall say to his father or his mother, It is a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; (Matthew:15:5)


Gift — A present; specifically, a sacrifice: — gift offering.

Profited — to be useful that is to benefit: — advantage better prevail profit.


In the Gospel of Mark:


But ye say, If a man shall say to his father or mother, It is Corban, that is to say, a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; he shall be free; (Mark:7:11)


The author of the Gospel of Matthew didn’t use the word, “Corban!” I’m surprised, but at the same time, not surprised.


The word, “Corban” is unique to the Gospel of Mark which means, more often, than not, that the character Jesus probably did say it.


And honour not his father or his mother, he shall be free. Thus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition. (Matthew:15:6)


Ye hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy of you, saying, (Matthew:15:7)


This people draweth nigh unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lips; but their heart is far from me. (Matthew:15:8)


But in vain they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men. (Matthew:15:9)


Old Testament:


Wherefore the Lord said, Forasmuch as this people draw near me with their mouth, and with their lips do honour me, but have removed their heart far from me, and their fear toward me is taught by the precept of men: (Isaiah:29:13)


And he called the multitude, and said unto them, Hear, and understand: (Matthew:15:10)

Not that which goeth into the mouth defileth a man; but that which cometh out of the mouth, this defileth a man. (Matthew:15:11)


In the Gospel of Mark, the author writes, “There is nothing from without a man, that entering into him can defile him: but the things which come out of him, those are they that defile the man.”


To most this difference seems minor, but the difference is huge if you consider that one author is talking about, “Spirits” and the other about words.


The author of the Gospel of Mark doesn’t use the word, “Mouth,” not once, which makes the account of, “What Defiles a Man,” a “Parable,” which the author of the Gospel of Matthew, “Totally Misinterpreted.”


Then came his disciples, and said unto him, Knowest thou that the Pharisees were offended, after they heard this saying? (Matthew:15:12)


Offended — to entrap that is trip up (figuratively stumble [transitively] or entice to sin apostasy or displeasure): — (make to) offend.


The phrase, “Pharisees were offended,” is unique to the Gospel of Matthew which means the disciples of the character Jesus probably didn’t say it.


But he answered and said, Every plant, which my heavenly Father hath not planted, shall be rooted up. (Matthew:15:13)


Let them alone: they be blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch. (Matthew:15:14)


Blind — opaque (as if smoky) that is (by analogy) blind (physically or mentally): — blind.

Opaque — not able to be seen through; not transparent.


Verses thirteen and fourteen of chapter fifteen were probably added by the author of the Gospel of Matthew to create, “Division and Drama!”


Then answered Peter and said unto him, Declare unto us this parable. (Matthew:15:15)


The character Peter is not mentioned in the Gospel of Mark.


And Jesus said, Are ye also yet without understanding? (Matthew:15:16)


Do not ye yet understand, that whatsoever entereth in at the mouth goeth into the belly, and is cast out into the draught? (Matthew:15:17)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he saith unto them, Are ye so without understanding also? Do ye not perceive, that whatsoever thing from without entereth into the man, it cannot defile him; (Mark:7:18)


But those things which proceed out of the mouth come forth from the heart; and they defile the man. (Matthew:15:18)


In the New Testament, the phrase, “Out of the mouth,” is unique to the Gospels of Matthew and Luke which means the character Jesus probably didn’t sat it.


For out of the heart proceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, blasphemies: (Matthew:15:19)


These are the things which defile a man: but to eat with unwashen hands defileth not a man. (Matthew:15:20)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he said, That which cometh out of the man, that defileth the man. (Mark:7:20)


The “Mouth” has nothing whatsoever to do with, “Defiling” a man in the Gospel of Mark or in life!


Luke


The author of the Gospel of Luke doesn’t have anything to say about, “What Defiles a Man.” The author of the Gospel of Luke has nothing to say about, “Feeding the Four Thousand” or the character Jesus, “Walking on the Sea,” either.

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