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Walks on the Sea


And when even was come, the ship was in the midst of the sea, and he alone on the land. (Mark:6:47)


And he saw them toiling in rowing; for the wind was contrary unto them: and about the fourth watch of the night he cometh unto them, walking upon the sea, and would have passed by them. (Mark:6:48)


The phrase, “Walking upon the sea,” is unique to the Gospel of Mark.


But when they saw him walking upon the sea, they supposed it had been a spirit, and cried out: (Mark:6:49)


The phrase, “They supposed it had been a spirit,” is also unique to the Gospel of Mark, but of course, being the “First Gospel Written,” one should expect the Gospel of Mark to have many, “Unique to” verses.


For they all saw him, and were troubled. And immediately he talked with them, and saith unto them, Be of good cheer: it is I; be not afraid. (Mark:6:50)


Troubled — Of uncertain affinity; to stir or agitate (roil water): — trouble.


The phrase, “Be of good cheer: it is I; be not afraid,” of course, is unique to the Gospels of Mark and Matthew because, the author of the Gospel of Matthew used the Gospel of Mark as a source.


And he went up unto them into the ship; and the wind ceased: and they were sore amazed in themselves beyond measure, and wondered. (Mark:6:51)


Sore — much (adverb): — exceeding great (-ly) sore very (+ chiefest).


For they considered not the miracle of the loaves: for their heart was hardened. (Mark:6:52)


The author of the Gospel of Mark points out the fact that, not even the character Jesus’ closest followers could comprehend the fact that the character Jesus was more than a man.


And when they had passed over, they came into the land of Gennesaret, and drew to the shore. (Mark:6:53)


Gennesaret — Of Hebrew origin; to twang; a harp: — harp; Gennesaret (that is Kinnereth) a lake and plain in Palestine.


And when they were come out of the ship, straightway they knew him, (Mark:6:54)


And ran through that whole region round about, and began to carry about in beds those that were sick, where they heard he was. (Mark:6:55)


The meaning of the word, “Sick,” found in the Strong’s Concordance of the King James Version of the Holy Bible under the reference number G2560, adds a whole other “Dimension” to the significance of the stories of the character Jesus, in that it includes those who are, “Morally Sick,” as well….


And whithersoever he entered, into villages, or cities, or country, they laid the sick in the streets, and besought him that they might touch if it were but the border of his garment: and as many as touched him were made whole. (Mark:6:56)


Matthew


And when he had sent the multitudes away, he went up into a mountain apart to pray: and when the evening was come, he was there alone. (Matthew:14:23)


But the ship was now in the midst of the sea, tossed with waves: for the wind was contrary. (Matthew:14:24)


Contrary — opposite; figuratively antagonistic: — (over) against.


And in the fourth watch of the night Jesus went unto them, walking on the sea. (Matthew:14:25)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he saw them toiling in rowing; for the wind was contrary unto them: and about the fourth watch of the night he cometh unto them, walking upon the sea, and would have passed by them. (Mark:6:48)


Whatever the disciples saw, in the Gospel of Mark, it was going to pass by the ship.


It didn’t go unto them, walking on the sea, like in the Gospel of Matthew.


And when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, It is a spirit; and they cried out for fear. (Matthew:14:26)


Spirit — (properly concretely) a (mere) show (phantasm) that is specter: — spirit.


In the Gospel of Mark:


But when they saw him walking upon the sea, they supposed it had been a spirit, and cried out: (Mark:6:49)


For they all saw him, and were troubled. And immediately he talked with them, and saith unto them, Be of good cheer: it is I; be not afraid. (Mark:6:50)


The phrase, “They cried out for fear,” is unique to the Gospel of Matthew which means the disciples probably didn’t cry out of fear, as a matter of fact, the author of the Gospel of Mark, not even once, used the word, “Fear.”


But straightway Jesus spake unto them, saying, Be of good cheer; it is I; be not afraid. (Matthew:14:27)


And Peter answered him and said, Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water. (Matthew:14:28)


Peter — a (piece of) rock.


The name, “Peter” is not mentioned in the Gospel of Mark.


And he said, Come. And when Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus. (Matthew:14:29)


But when he saw the wind boisterous, he was afraid; and beginning to sink, he cried, saying, Lord, save me. (Matthew:14:30)


Boisterous — forcible (literally or figuratively): — boisterous mighty (-ier) powerful strong (-er man) valiant.


And immediately Jesus stretched forth his hand, and caught him, and said unto him, O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt? (Matthew:14:31)


Doubt — properly to duplicate that is (mentally) to waver (in opinion): — doubt.


And when they were come into the ship, the wind ceased. (Matthew:14:32)


Then they that were in the ship came and worshipped him, saying, Of a truth thou art the Son of God. (Matthew:14:33)


Although it is true, the character Jesus is the “Son of God,” that is, “Son” spelled with a capital “s,” it is also true that the only reason the author of the Gospel of Matthew “Wrote In” the character Peter and wrote the phrase, “Then they that were in the ship came and worshipped him, saying, Of a truth thou art the Son of God,” was to “Contradict” what was written in the Gospel of Mark, namely, “The fact that, not even the character Jesus’ closest followers could comprehend the fact that the character Jesus was more than a man!”


The character Jesus walked on the sea, in the form of “Spirit,” The character Peter was not involved in any way, whatsoever!


The phrase, “O thou of little faith,” in the Gospel of Matthew chapter fourteen verse thirty-one is only found in the Gospel of Matthew.


The word, “Faith,” that is the reference number, G3640 is only used in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke.


The word, “Doubt,” that is the reference number, G1365 is found in the Gospel of Matthew, only!


Whenever a “Word” or a “Phrase” is found only in the Gospel of Matthew or is only found in the Gospel of Luke or if a “Word” or a “Phrase” is only found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, the character Jesus, probably, didn’t say it and it probably, didn’t happen!


And when they were gone over, they came into the land of Gennesaret. (Matthew:14:34)


And when the men of that place had knowledge of him, they sent out into all that country round about, and brought unto him all that were diseased; (Matthew:14:35)


And besought him that they might only touch the hem of his garment: and as many as touched were made perfectly whole. (Matthew:14:36)


Luke


There isn’t an account in the Gospel of Luke about the Character Jesus walking on the sea.


The Gospel of Luke doesn’t have a carpenter or carpenter’s son story either, what’s up with that?

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