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Transfiguration


And he said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That there be some of them that stand here, which shall not taste of death, till they have seen the kingdom of God come with power. (Mark:9:1)


And after six days Jesus taketh with him Peter, and James, and John, and leadeth them up into an high mountain apart by themselves: and he was transfigured before them. (Mark:9:2)


Transfigured – to transform (literally or figuratively metamorphose): - change transfigure transform.


The phrase, “He was transfigured before them,” according to the meanings of the words found in the Strong’s Concordance means, the character Jesus was “Changed in Nature and Form.”


The characters Peter, James, and John, “Witnessed the kingdom of God come with power.”


And his raiment became shining, exceeding white as snow; so as no fuller on earth can white them. (Mark:9:3)


Fuller - (to tease cloth); a cloth dresser.


And there appeared unto them Elias with Moses: and they were talking with Jesus. (Mark:9:4)


Moses - drawing out (of the {water}) that {is} rescued; to pull out (literally or figuratively): - draw (out).


The phrase, “And there appeared unto them Elias with Moses,” indicates that Elias appeared and brought along Moses.


Using the meanings of the names, “Elias, Moses and Jesus, “The God of Jehovah drew out (of the {water}) that {is} rescued, the character Jesus or “Jehovah-saved.”


In other words, “Elias rescued Jehovah.”


What stood before the three characters; Peter, James and John were three entities in the form of spirits; Elias, Moses and the “Transfigured,” character Jesus.


And Peter answered and said to Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. (Mark:9:5)


For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid. (Mark:9:6)


Standing before the characters Peter, James and John were, “The God of Jehovah; Elias, the spirit of a dead man; Moses and a man that was, “Transfigured” into a spirit right before their eyes; the character Jesus: Of course, they were frightened out of their wits!


And there was a cloud that overshadowed them: and a voice came out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him. (Mark:9:7)


And suddenly, when they had looked round about, they saw no man any more, save Jesus only with themselves. (Mark:9:8)


Wow! That just happened!


The character Jesus declared, “That there be some of them that stand here, which shall not taste of death, till they have seen the kingdom of God come with power.


Did that not just happen?


The characters, Peter, James, and John would qualify as, “Some of them that stand here,” wouldn't they?


The character Jesus, a flesh and blood human being; transfigured into spirit; the spirit of a long dead, man, the character Moses and the God of Jehovah, Elias, all in the same place, at the same time, that would count as a “Kingdom Come,” wouldn’t it?


A “Transfiguration;” would count as, “Power,” wouldn't it?


And as they came down from the mountain, he charged them that they should tell no man what things they had seen, till the Son of man were risen from the dead. (Mark:9:9)


And they kept that saying with themselves, questioning one with another what the rising from the dead should mean. (Mark:9:10)


They, according to the author of the Gospel of Mark, just moments ago, that is, Peter, James a John saw, with their own two eyes, Moses: A man who had been dead for more than a thousand years!


The character Peter just offered to, “Make three tabernacles; one for thee, the character Jesus, one for Moses, and one for Elias,” which confirms the fact that, at least one, “Dead Man” had already been “Raised from the Dead;” the character Moses!


And they asked him, saying, Why say the scribes that Elias must first come? (Mark:9:11)


What?! Where did that question come from?


No doubt, by having the characters Peter, James and John ask such a ridiculous question; “Why say the scribes that Elias must first come,” the author obviously needed, someone, somewhere, at some time, to “Ponder” the “Answer.”


And he answered and told them, Elias verily cometh first, and restoreth all things; and how it is written of the Son of man, that he must suffer many things, and be set at nought. (Mark:9:12)


Restoreth – to reconstitute (in health home or organization): - restore (again).

Nought - to make utterly nothing of that is despise: - set at naught.


But I say unto you, That Elias is indeed come, and they have done unto him whatsoever they listed, as it is written of him. (Mark:9:13)


Listed - that is choose or prefer (literally or figuratively); by implication to wish that is be inclined to (sometimes adverbially gladly); impersonally for the future tense to be about to; by Hebraism to delight in: - desire be disposed (forward) intend list love mean please have rather (be) will (have -ling -ling [ly]).


Pondering:


And he answered and told them, Elias verily cometh first, and restoreth all things, and how it is written of the Son of man, that he must suffer many things, and be set at naught. (Mark:9:12)


But I say unto you, That Elias is indeed come, and they have done unto him whatsoever they listed, as it is written of him. (Mark:9:13)


The author of the Gospel of Mark chapter nine verses twelve and thirteen, wrote in such a way as to create what I’m calling, for lack of a better word, an “Illusion.”


Illusion – a thing that is or is likely to be wrongly perceived or interpreted by the senses.

· a deceptive appearance or impression.

· a false idea or belief.


At first glance, verse twelve chapter nine of the Gospel of Mark looks like a “Prediction.”


It “Seems” as if the character Jesus is saying that Elias will come, sometime in the “Future.”


It also “Seems,” at first glance, that the Son of man will suffer many things, sometime in the “Future.”


Then in verse thirteen, the author wrote, “But I say unto you, That Elias is indeed come,” which sounds more like a continuation of the phrase, “Elias verily cometh first, and restoreth all things,” in verse twelve, than it does the beginning to the phrase, “And they have done unto him whatsoever they listed, as it is written of him,” in verse thirteen.


The phrase, “And how it is written of the Son of man, that he must suffer many things, and be set at naught,” in verse twelve of chapter nine of the Gospel of Mark, sounds more like the beginning of the phrase, “And they have done unto him whatsoever they listed, as it is written of him,” than it does the end of the phrase, “Elias verily cometh first, and restoreth all things,” in verse twelve.


To make “Clear” the illusion, verses twelve and thirteen of chapter nine of the Gospel of Mark, need to be put together, properly:


And he answered and told them, Elias verily cometh first, and restoreth all things, but I say unto you, That Elias is indeed come.


And how it is written of the Son of man, that he must suffer many things, and be set at naught, and they have done unto him whatsoever they listed, as it is written of him.


Before you start screaming, “Blasphemy!” Think about it for a minute….


The way verse twelve of the Gospel of Mark chapter nine is written:


And he answered and told them, Elias verily cometh first, and restoreth all things, and how it is written of the Son of man, that he must suffer many things, and be set at nought. (Mark:9:12)


Makes it sound like the character Jesus is referring to himself as the Son of man.


That can’t be true, because nothing has been written about the character Jesus and he hasn’t suffered anything yet!


Also, the way verse thirteen of the Gospel of Mark chapter nine is written, makes it “Appear” as if Elias came, then someone did something to, “The God of Jehovah!”


But I say unto you, That Elias is indeed come, and they have done unto him whatsoever they listed, as it is written of him. (Mark:9:13)


What could any, “Human Being” do to the God of Jehovah and what things were written about the character Elias?


The name Elias showed up, for the first time, in the Gospel of Mark chapter six verse fifteen!


Matthew


And after six days Jesus taketh Peter, James, and John his brother, and bringeth them up into an high mountain apart, (Matthew:17:1)


And was transfigured before them: and his face did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as the light. (Matthew:17:2)


Why the author of the Gospel of Matthew felt it necessary to write, “And John his brother,” is a mystery.


And, behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with him. (Matthew:17:3)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And there appeared unto them Elias with Moses: and they were talking with Jesus. (Mark:9:4)


The way a verse or even a sentence is phrased, is especially important when studying the bible.


The difference between the phrases, “And, behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with him” and “And there appeared unto them Elias with Moses: and they were talking with Jesus,” is huge!


In the King James Version of the Holy Bible, the names are written in order of importance.


In the former, the author of the Gospel of Matthew wrote, “There appeared unto them Moses and Elias,” indicating that the character Moses was first in importance.


In the latter, the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, “There appeared unto them Elias with Moses,” indicating that the character Elias was first in importance.


Then answered Peter, and said unto Jesus, Lord, it is good for us to be here: if thou wilt, let us make here three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias. (Matthew:17:4)


While he yet spake, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them: and behold a voice out of the cloud, which said, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye him. (Matthew:17:5)


The phrase, “In whom I am well pleased; hear ye him,” is not in the Gospel of Mark:


And there was a cloud that overshadowed them: and a voice came out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him. (Mark:9:7)


The author of the Gospel of Matthew changed what the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote to make it seem as if the voice was talking to Peter, James and John.


Also, the author of the Gospel of Matthew took out the part where the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, about the character Peter:


For he wist not what to say; for they were sore afraid. (Mark:9:6)


And when the disciples heard it, they fell on their face, and were sore afraid. (Matthew:17:6)


In the Gospel of Mark, the disciples didn’t hear the voice from the cloud or fall on their faces.


And suddenly, when they had looked round about, they saw no man any more, save Jesus only with themselves. (Mark:9:8)


It seems perfectly natural to “Assume,” that if a voice came out of a cloud and there were people in the vicinity, those people would have heard the voice, right?


Let me remind you, everything written in the King James Version of the Holy Bible is written, “Metaphorically.”


The voice from the cloud could be speaking, “Directly to the Audience,” that is, to you and me.


Remember, the first time a “Mysterious” voice spoke in the Gospel of Mark:


And there came a voice from heaven, saying, Thou art my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. (Mark:1:11)


Everyone, including myself, at first, “Assumed,” the voice coming from the cloud was speaking to the character Jesus, only.


Now, with this “New Found Understanding” that the word, “Son,” spelled with a capital “s” for no apparent reason, should be understood as the, “Spirit Of,” the phrase, “Thou art my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased,” could be speaking to the character Jesus and those in the audience who have, “Ears to Hear.”


I’m just saying....


And Jesus came and touched them, and said, Arise, and be not afraid. (Matthew:17:7)


Nope, didn’t happen in the Gospel of Mark.


And when they had lifted up their eyes, they saw no man, save Jesus only. (Matthew:17:8)


And as they came down from the mountain, Jesus charged them, saying, Tell the vision to no man, until the Son of man be risen again from the dead. (Matthew:17:9)


Vision?!


The author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, “He charged them that they should tell no man what things they had seen.”


There is no mention of a vision.


The phrase, “Tell the vision to no man,” minimizes the, “Transfiguration,” in the minds of the audience, which I suspect, was the idea….


The phrase, “Until the Son of man be risen again from the dead,” in the Gospel of Matthew is different from the phrase, “Till the Son of man were risen from the dead,” in the Gospel of Mark.


The feeling that the author of the Gospel of Matthew is talking about, “One,” the character Jesus and that the author of the Gospel of Mark is talking about more than, “One,” weighs heavily on my mind.


And his disciples asked him, saying, Why then say the scribes that Elias must first come? (Matthew:17:10)


And Jesus answered and said unto them, Elias truly shall first come, and restore all things. (Matthew:17:11)


Shall come?!


But I say unto you, That Elias is come already, and they knew him not, but have done unto him whatsoever they listed. Likewise shall also the Son of man suffer of them. (Matthew:17:12)


And they knew him not?!


No ambiguity there!


The author of the Gospel of Matthew did us all a great, big favor: Gave us a “Clear and Concise” interpretation of what the author of the Gospel of Mark, “Meant to Say!”


Then the disciples understood that he spake unto them of John the Baptist. (Matthew:17:13)


I’ve noticed, during the course of my research that whenever the author of the Gospel of Matthew changes something that the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, it is more often than not, something, “Hard to Understand,” like a parable or an illusion.


The author of the Gospel of Matthew, adding, subtracting, twisting and turning the words of the Gospel of Mark around is proof enough, for me, hopefully, you too, that Elias, is not John the Baptist and the Son of man, is not the character Jesus!


Then there’s the phrase, “Then the disciples understood that he spake unto them of John the Baptist?!”

Really?


The disciplines of the character Jesus finally understood something?!


For the disciples of the character Jesus to understand the connection between Moses, Elias, John the Baptist, and the character Jesus would take more than a miracle.


Luke


And it came to pass about an eight days after these sayings, he took Peter and John and James, and went up into a mountain to pray. (Luke:9:28)


Eight days? To pray?


The author or authors of the Gospel of Luke, for whatever reason, wrote that the character Jesus took the characters Peter, John, and James, not Peter, James, and John, like in both the Gospels of Mark and Matthew, up into a mountain to pray.


Instead of six days like the authors of the Gospels of Mark and Matthew, it’s eight days.


Of course, it makes sense if the author is trying to distinguish the Gospel of Luke from the other Gospels: The sources.


To remind you of the “Motive” and/or “Agenda” of the author, authors and/or “Authorities” of the Gospel of Luke:


Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us, (Luke:1:1)


Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word; (Luke:1:2)


It seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write unto thee in order, most excellent Theophilus, (Luke:1:3)


That thou mightest know the certainty of those things, wherein thou hast been instructed. (Luke:1:4)


And as he prayed, the fashion of his countenance was altered, and his raiment was white and glistering. (Luke:9:29)


And, behold, there talked with him two men, which were Moses and Elias: (Luke:9:30)


So now, instead of using the word, “Transfigured” to describe what happened on the mountain that day, the author, “Authors” or “Powers that Be,” whoever “Fabricated” the Gospel of Luke, minimized the situation!


Moses and Elias are now, for sure “Two Men” talking to the character Jesus, instead of, “The God of Jehovah and the Spirit of a Dead Man!


Notice that the character Moses is put in the position of most important, like in the Gospel of Matthew.


It seems, in the case of the name, “Theophilus,” that the author of the Gospel of Luke was aware of its meaning; “Friend of God,” to whom the Gospel of Luke, “Seems” to be written.


Are we to believe that whoever wrote this Gospel didn’t know the meaning of the name “Elias;” God of Jehovah?


Or:


Is the author of the Gospel of Luke very aware of the meaning of the name “Elias” and that’s why Moses and Elias are now labeled, “Two men,” to conceal the fact that the name, “Elias” means; the God of Jehovah?!


Who appeared in glory, and spake of his decease which he should accomplish at Jerusalem. (Luke:9:31)


Decease - an exit that is (figuratively) death: - decease departing.


The author of the Gospel of Luke used both the Gospels of Mark and Matthew as sources.


Neither Gospels mentioned what Moses, Elias and the character Jesus were talking about.


But Peter and they that were with him were heavy with sleep: and when they were awake, they saw his glory, and the two men that stood with him. (Luke:9:32)


The author of the Gospel of Luke is, “Killing Me!”


The author of the Gospel of Matthew threw “Shade” on the “Transfiguration of the character Jesus” by saying that the character Jesus said, “Tell the vision to no man.”


Now the author of the Gospel of Luke wants us to believe that “Peter and they that were with him,” were “Heavy with sleep,” as in DREAMINGthey saw Moses and Elias talking with the character Jesus!!!


And it came to pass, as they departed from him, Peter said unto Jesus, Master, it is good for us to be here: and let us make three tabernacles; one for thee, and one for Moses, and one for Elias: not knowing what he said. (Luke:9:33)


At least, in the Gospel of Luke it is said of the character Peter, he, “Not knowing what he said.”


That the character Peter, “Didn’t know what he was saying,” was left out of the account in the Gospel of Matthew, remember?


While he thus spake, there came a cloud, and overshadowed them: and they feared as they entered into the cloud. (Luke:9:34)


The cloud “Overshadowed” them and they, “Feared,” as they entered into the cloud, is only in the Gospel of Luke.


And there came a voice out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him. (Luke:9:35)


And when the voice was past, Jesus was found alone. And they kept it close, and told no man in those days any of those things which they had seen. (Luke:9:36)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And there was a cloud that overshadowed them: and a voice came out of the cloud, saying, This is my beloved Son: hear him. (Mark:9:7)


And suddenly, when they had looked round about, they saw no man any more, save Jesus only with themselves. (Mark:9:8)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


And when the disciples heard it, they fell on their face, and were sore afraid. (Matthew:17:6)


And Jesus came and touched them, and said, Arise, and be not afraid. (Matthew:17:7)


And when they had lifted up their eyes, they saw no man, save Jesus only. (Matthew:17:8)


Witness the incredible power of the written word!


If we were in the same situation as the people who were there at the time; thirty to forty years after the death of the character Jesus, with one or the other Gospel instead of all three, we’d be, “Happily Following the Leader,” of whose ever Gospel we just happen to be exposed!


The same exact event: Three different versions: Coincidence or deliberate?


Deliberate, I’m sure…

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