Search

Simon’s House

Updated: Feb 4, 2021


And forthwith, when they were come out of the synagogue, they entered into the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. (Mark:1:29)


But Simon’s wife’s mother lay sick of a fever, and anon they tell him of her. (Mark:1:30)


Anon — directly that is at once or soon: — anon as soon as forthwith immediately shortly straightway.


And he came and took her by the hand, and lifted her up; and immediately the fever left her, and she ministered unto them. (Mark:1:31)


And at even, when the sun did set, they brought unto him all that were diseased, and them that were possessed with devils. (Mark:1:32)


Devils – (G1139) to be exercised by a daemon: — have a (be vexed with be possessed with) devil (-s).


The character Jesus, along with his disciples and probably all those who listened to his doctrine during his lifetime, spoke Aramaic, the authors of the New Testament were probably Greek educated Jews.


The word as well as the whole concept of a “Devil,” is a Greek understanding or mythology.


And all the city was gathered together at the door. (Mark:1:33)


And he healed many that were sick of divers diseases, and cast out many devils; and suffered not the devils to speak, because they knew him. (Mark:1:34)


Divers — Of uncertain derivation; motley that is various in character: — divers manifold.


And in the morning, rising up a great while before day, he went out, and departed into a solitary place, and there prayed. (Mark:1:35)


And Simon and they that were with him followed after him. (Mark:1:36)


And when they had found him, they said unto him, All men seek for thee. (Mark:1:37)


And he said unto them, Let us go into the next towns, that I may preach there also: for therefore came I forth. (Mark:1:38)


“For therefore came I forth?” Who talks like that?


“For therefore was I born,” maybe a person would say that.


To say, for therefore came I forth makes me believe that the character Jesus is referring to the Spirit like a dove.


Mark chapter one verse ten:


And straightway coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens opened, and the Spirit like a dove descending upon him: (Mark:1:10)


The “Man,” a flesh and blood human being has become, “One with the “Spirit.”


So, when the character Jesus says, “For therefore came I forth,” he’s speaking about and as the “Spirit.”


The “Spirit” is the “Son,” spelled with a capital “s” for no apparent reason.


It seems the character Jesus is a flesh and blood human being, with the “Son” or spirit of God.


Matthew

And when Jesus was come into Peter’s house, he saw his wife’s mother laid, and sick of a fever. (Matthew:8:14)

In the Gospel of Mark:


And forthwith, when they were come out of the synagogue, they entered into the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. (Mark:1:29)


But Simon’s wife’s mother lay sick of a fever, and anon they tell him of her. (Mark:1:30)


The author of the Gospel of Matthew just, “Went and Changed” the character Simon’s name to “Peter!”


And he touched her hand, and the fever left her: and she arose, and ministered unto them. (Matthew:8:15)


Ministered — to be an attendant that is wait upon (menially or as a host friend or [figuratively] teacher); technically to act as a Christian deacon: — (ad-) minister (unto) serve use the office of a deacon.


In the definition of the word, “Ministered,” the phrase, “Technically to act as a Christian deacon,” indicates, that the authors of the Strong’s Concordance were “Christians on a mission!”


“Christians On a Mission” is the “They” sometimes referred to throughout these writings.


When the even was come, they brought unto him many that were possessed with devils: and he cast out the spirits with his word, and healed all that were sick: (Matthew:8:16)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he healed many that were sick of divers diseases, and cast out many devils; and suffered not the devils to speak, because they knew him. (Mark:1:34)


With his word?!


The phrase, “With his word,” in the Synoptic Gospels, is unique to the Gospels of Matthew and Luke which means the character Jesus probably didn’t do that.


As is usual with the author of the Gospel of Matthew, the phrase, “He cast out the spirits with his word,” points to the character Jesus being, “Old Testament God,” like.”


That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses. (Matthew:8:17)


In the Old Testament:


Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. (Isaiah:53:4)


In the same way that the author of the Gospel of Luke can’t help, “Putting More on It,” the author of the Gospel of Matthew can’t help throwing scripture from the Old Testament into every possible opening!


Now when Jesus saw great multitudes about him, he gave commandment to depart unto the other side. (Matthew:8:18)


Luke


And he arose out of the synagogue, and entered into Simon’s house. And Simon’s wife’s mother was taken with a great fever; and they besought him for her. (Luke:4:38)


In the Gospel of Luke, it’s Simon’s house, not Peter’s house like in the Gospel of Matthew and no Andrew, no James and no John, like in the Gospel of Mark….


It's amazing how the Synoptic Gospels tells the same stories, about the same characters and same “Devils,” but use different words or even more amazing, the same words with different meanings!


And he stood over her, and rebuked the fever; and it left her: and immediately she arose and ministered unto them. (Luke:4:39)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he came and took her by the hand, and lifted her up; and immediately the fever left her, and she ministered unto them. (Mark:1:31)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


And he touched her hand, and the fever left her: and she arose, and ministered unto them. (Matthew:8:15)


It’s “Over kill” to say, “And he stood over her, and rebuked the fever; and it left her.”


Anyway, how do you “Rebuke” a fever? It’s not a devil or a spirit, is it?!


Just another, “Putting More on It” moment in the Gospel of Luke….


Now when the sun was setting, all they that had any sick with divers’ diseases brought them unto him; and he laid his hands on every one of them, and healed them. (Luke:4:40)


And devils also came out of many, crying out, and saying, Thou art Christ the Son of God. And he rebuking them suffered them not to speak: for they knew that he was Christ. (Luke:4:41)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he healed many that were sick of divers diseases, and cast out many devils; and suffered not the devils to speak, because they knew him. (Mark:1:34)


And in the morning, rising up a great while before day, he went out, and departed into a solitary place, and there prayed. (Mark:1:35)


In verse forty-one chapter four the phrase, “Thou art Christ the Son of God, is unique to the Gospel of Luke.


There are phrases like, “Thou art Christ the Son of God.


In the Gospel of Mark:


The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; (Mark:1:1)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


And Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. (Matthew:16:16)


But Jesus held his peace, And the high priest answered and said unto him, I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God. (Matthew:26:63)


As you can see, there are phrases that are “Like” the phrase, “Thou art Christ the Son of God” and one of them, “Declares Definitively” that the character Jesus is, “Christ” and the “Son of God!”


There are a couple of problems. In the Gospel of Matthew, it’s the character, “Peter,” the character added during the “Great Revision of the Synoptic Gospels,” by the author, “Authors” or “Authorities” of the Gospel of Luke who’s making the claim.


Another problem is that the character Jesus being called, “The Christ, the Son of the living God” or “Christ the Son of God” is only found in the first verse of the Gospel of Mark, which was probably added along with the character Peter and in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, which means the character Jesus is probably not the “Christ” or “The Son of God,” at least not in the way that the authors of the first verse of the Gospel of Mark and the Gospels of Matthew and Luke are trying to sell it!


And when it was day, he departed and went into a desert place: and the people sought him, and came unto him, and stayed him, that he should not depart from them. (Luke:4:42)


And he said unto them, I must preach the kingdom of God to other cities also: for therefore am I sent. (Luke:4:43)


Preach — to announce good news (evangelize) especially the gospel: — declare bring (declare show) glad (good) tidings preach (the gospel).

Kingdom — properly royalty that is (abstractly) rule or (concretely) a realm (literally or figuratively): — kingdom + reign.

God — Of uncertain affinity; a deity especially the supreme Divinity; figuratively a magistrate; by Hebraism very: — X exceeding God god [-ly -ward].

Sent — set apart that is (by implication) to send out (properly on a mission) literally or figuratively: — put in send (away forth out) set [at liberty].


This is the reason for my meticulous examination of the scriptures.


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he said unto them, Let us go into the next towns, that I may preach there also: for therefore came I forth. (Mark:1:338)


In the Gospel of Luke:


And he said unto them, I must preach the kingdom of God to other cities also: for therefore am I sent. (Luke:4:43)


Notice the difference in wording. In the Gospel of Mark, the first Gospel written about the character Jesus, it reads, “For therefore came I forth.


In keeping with the portrayal of the character Jesus as a flesh and blood human being, the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, “For therefore came I forth, as in, coming forth from God.


In the Gospel of Luke, the third Gospel written about the character Jesus it reads, “For therefore am I sent.”


In keeping with an agenda of looking towards the future, the author of the Gospel of Luke wrote, “For therefore am I sent,” connecting the character Jesus being a modern-day, “Prophet,” at least “Modern” in the days of the character Jesus, to the word, “Apostle.”


Apostle – (G652) a delegate; specifically, an ambassador of the Gospel; officially a commissioner of Christ (apostle) (with miraculous powers): - apostle messenger he that is sent.


Why connect the character Jesus to the word, “Apostle?” So that characters after the character Jesus, like the characters Peter, James, John and Paul could continue the “Fiction of the Christ.”


An “Apostle” of God, would be an “Angel!”


An “Apostle” of the character Jesus, if there was such a thing, would have been a human being who was, “Sent Out” to do a thing…

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

And he arose from thence, and cometh into the coasts of Judaea by the farther side of Jordan: and the people resort unto him again; and, as he was wont, he taught them again. (Mark:10:1) Resort - to j

For every one shall be salted with fire, and every sacrifice shall be salted with salt. (Mark:9:49) Salted – salt. Fire - A primary word; fire (literally or figuratively specifically lightning): - fie

And if thy hand offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter into life maimed, than having two hands to go into hell, into the fire that never shall be quenched: (Mark:9:43) Hell – a gorge