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My beloved Son

Updated: Feb 2, 2021

According to most modern-day scholars, the “Virgin Mary” story and the “Genealogies” found in the Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Luke are “Total Fiction,” that is, “Make Believe.”


Because of that fact, only the stories that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke have in common with the first Gospel written, the Gospel of Mark, will be “Examined.”


With that said:


The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; (Mark:1:1)


Gospel — a good message that is the gospel.

Jesus — Jehovah-saved.

Christ — anointed; to smear or rub with oil.

God — a deity; the supreme Divinity.


The opening verse to the Gospel of Mark is more of a “Title” then it is an actual verse. It describes the author’s opinion about what the overall writing is supposed to be about. It may have been added after the original manuscript’s publication.


As it is written in the prophets, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee. (Mark:1:2)


Prophet — a foreteller.

Messenger — to bring tidings; a messenger; especially an angel.


The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. (Mark:1:3)


Lord - (G2962) supremacy; supreme in authority that is (as noun) controller.


John did baptize in the wilderness, and preach the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins. (Mark:1:4)


And there went out unto him all the land of Judaea, and they of Jerusalem, and were all baptized of him in the river of Jordan, confessing their sins. (Mark:1:5)


And John was clothed with camel’s hair, and with a girdle of a skin about his loins; and he did eat locusts and wild honey; (Mark:1:6)


And preached, saying, There cometh one mightier than I after me, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to stoop down and unloose. (Mark:1:7)


I indeed have baptized you with water: but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost. (Mark:1:8)


Holy — an awful thing; sacred (physically pure morally blameless or religious ceremonially consecrated): — (most) holy (one thing) saint.

Ghost — a current of air that is breath (blast) or a breeze; by analogy or figuratively a spirit that is (human) the rational soul (by implication) vital principle mental disposition etc. or (superhuman) an angel daemon or (divine) God Christ´ s spirit the Holy spirit: — ghost life spirit (-ual -ually) mind.


And it came to pass in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan. (Mark:1:9)


John — Jehovah-favored.

Nazareth — a place in Palestine.

Galilee — a circle (with the article); Galil (as a special circuit) in the North of Palestine; Galilaea (that is the heathen circle) a region of Palestine.


The Gospel of Mark is the most authentic; genuine of the four Gospels. It’s the story of the “Man” Jesus, who it just so happens that “God” chose him to be his representative on earth.


While the character Jesus being baptized by the character John the Baptist is a possibility, the “Back Story” of the character, “John the Baptist,” leaves a lot to be desired….


The opening verses were taken from the Old Testament Books of Malachi and Isaiah:


Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the LORD, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts. (Malachi:3:1)


The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. (Isaiah:40:3)


John was baptizing for the “Remission of Sins.”


For the remission of sins?


What sins could the character Jesus have committed?


I’m guessing, the same sins any other man could have committed!


After all, the character Jesus was a man, at least in the Gospel of Mark.


The character Jesus was a man from the city of Nazareth in Galilee.


Galilee circle (with the article); Galil (as a special circuit) in the North of Palestine; Galilea (that is the heathen circle) a region of Palestine.

Heathen from G1484; national (ethnic) that is (specifically) a Gentile: heathen (man).

G1484 a race (as of the same habit) that is a tribe; specifically, a foreign (non-Jewish) one (usually by implication pagan): Gentile heathen nation people.


And straightway coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens opened, and the Spirit like a dove descending upon him: (Mark:1:10)


Spirit – (4151) a current of air that is breath (blast) or a breeze; by analogy or figuratively a spirit that is (human) the rational soul (by implication) vital principle mental disposition etc. or (superhuman) an angel daemon or (divine) God Christ´ s spirit the Holy spirit: — ghost life spirit (-ual -ually) mind.


The word, “Ghost” and the word “Spirit” have the same meaning.


And there came a voice from heaven, saying, Thou art my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. (Mark:1:11)


A voice from heaven said, Thou art my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.


Two things:


1. The voice said, “Thou art my Son.” The voice was speaking to, it is supposed, the character Jesus.


If the voice is speaking to the character Jesus, how does the author of the Gospel of Mark know what was said?

The author couldn’t have known what the voice said, but we, the audience do know. The author wrote from the point of view of an “Observer.”


2. The word Son is spelled with a capital “s” for no apparent reason.


A word spelled with a capital letter, in the English language, follows certain rules.


Capitalization rule #2


Use capitals for proper nouns. In other words, capitalize the names of people, specific places, and things. For example: We don’t capitalize the word “bridge” unless it starts a sentence, but we must capitalize Brooklyn Bridge because it is the name of a specific bridge.


The word “Son” is used many times throughout the Holy Scriptures, most times consistent with the above rule.


There are other words that are exceptions to the rule. They also are spelled with capital letters for no apparent reason.


Why the exceptions?


In the case of the word “Son” being spelled with a capital “s” for no apparent reason, when that occurs it should be understood as meaning, “The spirit of the word, “Son.”

Son – (G5207) a son (sometimes of animals) used very widely of immediate remote or figurative kinship: - child foal son.


So, the beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God becomes, “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, who is of some sort of spiritual kinship of God.


Matthew


The author of the Gospel of Matthew used the Gospel of Mark as a source. In the Gospel of Matthew, the character Jesus is portrayed as a “Messiah.”


Messiah From H4886; anointed; usually a consecrated person (as a {king} {priest} or saint); specifically, the Messiah: {anointed} Messiah.

H4886 to rub with {oil} that {is} to anoint; by implication to consecrate; also, to paint: {anoint} paint.


The word, “Messiah” is only used two times in the entire Holy Bible. It is used in the Old Testament Book of Daniel chapter nine verses twenty-five and twenty-six.


Know therefore and understand, that from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince shall be seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times. (Daniel:9:25)


And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined. (Daniel:9:26)


A Messiah is someone who has been anointed; rubbed oil upon, like a king or a prince.


Daniel chapter nine verses twenty-five and twenty-six are speaking about a “Prince!”


Because, and only because, the author of the Gospel of Matthew was “Greatly” offended by what the author of the Gospel of Mark had written, that is, a book about a “Heathen from Nazareth of Galilee Performing Great Miracles,” did a Jewish Messiah emerge from the depths of the author of the Gospel of Matthew’s “Imagination!”


Knowing, that no one who was familiar with the Hebrew scriptures would entertain the “Ludicrous” idea of a “Messiah from Galilee,” the author of the Gospel of Matthew used the Greek word, “Christ,” which means the same as the Hebrew word Messiah, to disguise the character Jesus, who became, on paper and in the minds of many, “Jesus Christ” or “Jesus the Messiah!”


The word Messiah and the word Christ share the same meaning, but neither is the last name of the character Jesus.


The author of the Gospel of Matthew dug deep into the Hebrew scriptures to find a story to tell that would, without a doubt, make the character Jesus one hundred percent, Jewish!


The author decided that the story of Moses, the Jewish leader who rescued the Israelites from Egypt, was, “Just What the Doctor ordered!”


With that said:


In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, (Matthew:3:1)


And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. (Matthew:3:2)


Heaven — the same as G3735 (through the idea of elevation); the sky; by extension heaven (as the abode of God); by implication happiness power; eternity; specifically the Gospel (Christianity): — air heaven ([-ly]) sky.

G3735 — a mountain (as lifting itself above the plain): — hill mount (-ain).


The phrase, “Kingdom of heaven” appears thirty-four times in the “New Testament” of the bible. Once in the Gospel of Luke, once in the Book of Revelations and thirty-two times in the Gospel of Matthew!


It’s sad to say, but the author of the Gospel of Matthew probably, “Made Up the Kingdom of Heaven.”


For this is he that was spoken of by the prophet Esaias, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. (Matthew:3:3)


It seems that the name, “Esaias” is the Greek spelling of the name Isaiah, because although most times the author of the Gospel of Matthew gets it wrong, the verses referred to are similar to those in the Book of Isaiah:


The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. (Isaiah:40:3)


And the same John had his raiment of camel’s hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and his meat was locusts and wild honey. (Matthew:3:4)


Then went out to him Jerusalem, and all Judaea, and all the region round about Jordan, (Matthew:3:5)


And were baptized of him in Jordan, confessing their sins. (Matthew:3:6)


But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? (Matthew:3:7)


Bring forth therefore fruits meet for repentance: (Matthew:3:8)


And think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, that God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham. (Matthew:3:9)


And now also the axe is laid unto the root of the trees: therefore every tree which bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. (Matthew:3:10)


I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance: but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire: (Matthew:3:11)


In the Gospel of Mark:


I indeed have baptized you with water: but he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost. (Mark:1:8)


Whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and gather his wheat into the garner; but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire. (Matthew:3:12)


This account in Matthew chapter three verses seven through eleven is also in Luke chapter three verses seven through nine.


If the Gospels of Matthew and Luke are the only places a saying of the character Jesus can be found, it’s probably not a saying of the character Jesus.


It’s most likely something that the author of the Gospel of Matthew made up and the author of the Gospel of Luke copied and changed!


If the only place a saying of the character Jesus can be found is the Gospel of Mark, first check to see if the author of the Gospel of Matthew changed it in any way.


If it has been changed in any way by the author of the Gospel of Matthew, it’s something the character Jesus probably said.


This whole, “Fire and Brimstone;” “Heaven and Hell; “Righteous and Sinner” thing that permeates the Christian belief system is most likely a product of the authors of Matthew’s and Luke’s fertile imaginations.


Then cometh Jesus from Galilee to Jordan unto John, to be baptized of him. (Matthew:3:13)


But John forbad him, saying, I have need to be baptized of thee, and comest thou to me? (Matthew:3:14)


And Jesus answering said unto him, Suffer it to be so now: for thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness. Then he suffered him. (Matthew:3:15)


Verses fourteen and fifteen of chapter three are unique to the Gospel of Matthew which means that conversation probably didn’t happen.


And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him: (Matthew:3:16)


The author of the Gospel of Matthew changed what the author of Mark wrote:

And straightway coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens opened, and the Spirit like a dove descending upon him: (Mark:1:10)


That which came down like a dove, went from a “Spirit” in the Gospel of Mark to the, “Spirit of God” in the Gospel of Matthew….


And lo a voice from heaven, saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. (Matthew:3:17)


In the Gospel of Mark, the character Jesus is the only person who knows that he had been chosen by God.


In the Gospel of Matthew, everyone within the sound of the voice from heaven heard the “Great Announcement!”


Luke


The author of the Gospel of Luke used the Gospel of Mark and the Gospel of Matthew as sources.


The Gospel of Luke portrays the character Jesus as a Jewish “Prophet” who was rejected by his people.


So, being rejected by his “Own,” the character Jesus resorts to spreading the “Good News” to everyone, including the “Gentiles.”


The author of the Gospel of Luke is faced with a serious dilemma. There are two books written about the character Jesus.


One of the books claim to be, “The beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; a heathen from Nazareth of Galilee.


The other book claims to be, “The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham;” whose birth was on this wise:


When as his mother Mary was espoused to Joseph, before they came together, had sex, she was found with child of the “Holy Ghost.”


The author of the second book, the Gospel of Matthew, fashioned the story of the character Jesus after the “Famous” Jewish leader, Moses!


Now, how is an author of the Gospel of Luke going to contend with stories like that?


Simple, copy pertinent information from each of the two stories, but instead of a Messiah for the Jews, make the story about a Jewish Prophet for the “Multitudes!”

Instead of fashioning a story about a famous Jewish leader, mimic the stories of the “Famous Old Testament “Prophets; Elijah and Elisha!”


With that said:


Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene, (Luke:3:1)


Right out the gate, the author of the Gospel of Luke wants to impress the audience with great detail, professional writing, undeniable knowledge and obvious, “Name Dropping!”


Annas and Caiaphas being the high priests, the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the wilderness. (Luke:3:2)


And he came into all the country about Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins; (Luke:3:3)


As it is written in the book of the words of Esaias the prophet, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. (Luke:3:4)


Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low; and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways shall be made smooth; (Luke:3:5)


And all flesh shall see the salvation of God. (Luke:3:6)


I can’t, for the life of me, figure out why the authors of Mark, Matthew and Luke decided to take the following scriptures out of context:


Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your God. (Isaiah:40:1)


Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, and cry unto her, that her warfare is accomplished, that her iniquity is pardoned: for she hath received of the LORD’s hand double for all her sins. (Isaiah:40:2)


The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the LORD, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. (Isaiah:40:3)


Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain: (Isaiah:40:4)


And the glory of the LORD shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together: for the mouth of the LORD hath spoken it. (Isaiah:40:5)


Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me: and the LORD, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts. (Malachi:3:1)


I’m guessing it’s because they wanted John the Baptist to be someone, “Foretold by scripture” alongside the character Jesus?!


Then said he to the multitude that came forth to be baptized of him, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? (Luke:3:7)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


“But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come?” (Matthew:3:7)


The author of the Gospel of Luke changed, “Pharisees and Sadducees” to the “Multitude.”


It seems the author of the Gospel of Matthew has a problem with Pharisees and Sadducees, which gives somewhat of a clue to the identity of the author.


The author of the Gospel of Matthew was probably a Greek educated Jewish scribe.


Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of repentance, and begin not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, That God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham. (Luke:3:8)


Abraham — Of Hebrew origin [H85]; Abraham the Hebrew patriarch.

H85 — Contracted from H1 and an unused root (probably meaning to be populous); father of a multitude.


And now also the axe is laid unto the root of the trees: every tree therefore which bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. (Luke:3:9)


And the people asked him, saying, What shall we do then? (Luke:3:10)


He answereth and saith unto them, He that hath two coats, let him impart to him that hath none; and he that hath meat, let him do likewise. (Luke:3:11)


Then came also publicans to be baptized, and said unto him, Master, what shall we do? (Luke:3:12)


And he said unto them, Exact no more than that which is appointed you. (Luke:3:13)


And the soldiers likewise demanded of him, saying, And what shall we do? And he said unto them, Do violence to no man, neither accuse any falsely; and be content with your wages. (Luke:3:14)


The author of the Gospel of Luke changed the account in the Gospel of Matthew from the condemnation of the Jewish leaders to the condemnation of the whole multitude of people; publicans and soldiers included!


Then the author of the Gospel of Luke, has John the Baptist “Instruct,” the people, the publicans and the soldiers on what they should do so as not to be “Hewed down, and casted into the fire.”


Really?!


This little “Move” by the author of the Gospel of Luke also gives a clue.


The author of the Gospel of Luke is probably a high-ranking member of the Sanhedrin or at least a high priest.


Sanhedrin - the supreme council and tribunal of the Jews during postexilic times headed by a High Priest and having religious, civil, and criminal jurisdiction.


And as the people were in expectation, and all men mused in their hearts of John, whether he were the Christ, or not; (Luke:3:15)


John answered, saying unto them all, I indeed baptize you with water; but one mightier than I cometh, the latchet of whose shoes I am not worthy to unloose: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost and with fire: (Luke:3:16)


Fire — fire (literally or figuratively specifically lightning).


Whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and will gather the wheat into his garner; but the chaff he will burn with fire unquenchable. (Luke:3:17)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


Whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and gather his wheat into the garner; but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire. (Matthew:3:12)


The Gospel of Luke chapter three verse seventeen and the Gospel of Matthew chapter three verse twelve are almost identical and found only in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, which means the character John the Baptist probably didn’t say it.


And many other things in his exhortation preached he unto the people. (Luke:3:18)


But Herod the tetrarch, being reproved by him for Herodias his brother Philip’s wife, and for all the evils which Herod had done, (Luke:3:19)


Added yet this above all, that he shut up John in prison. (Luke:3:20)


Now when all the people were baptized, it came to pass, that Jesus also being baptized, and praying, the heaven was opened, (Luke:3:21)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And it came to pass in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan. (Mark:1:9)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


Then cometh Jesus from Galilee to Jordan unto John, to be baptized of him. (Matthew:3:13)


But John forbad him, saying, I have need to be baptized of thee, and comest thou to me? (Matthew:3:14)


And Jesus answering said unto him, Suffer it to be so now: for thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness. Then he suffered him. (Matthew:3:15)


The phrase, “Baptized, and praying,” is unique to the Gospel of Luke which means the character Jesus probably wasn’t being baptized and praying.


And the Holy Ghost descended in a bodily shape like a dove upon him, and a voice came from heaven, which said, Thou art my beloved Son; in thee I am well pleased. (Luke:3:22)


The three different versions of the same event is only one of the reasons why I suspect the “John the Baptist Story” probably didn’t happen.


In the Gospel of Mark, the “Spirit” descended like a dove.


In the Gospel of Matthew, the “Spirit of God” descended like a dove.


In the Gospel of Luke, the “Holy Ghost” descended in a bodily shape like a dove, then:


But Herod the tetrarch, being reproved by him for Herodias his brother Philip’s wife, and for all the evils which Herod had done, (Luke:3:19)


Added yet this above all, that he shut up John in prison. (Luke:3:20)


It seems that verses nineteen and twenty chapter three of the Gospel of Luke was an, “Afterthought!”


There is just too much going on in the opening scenes of this, “Metaphoric Tale” to believe….

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