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Millstone About His Neck


And whosoever shall offend one of these little ones that believe in me, it is better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he were cast into the sea. (Mark:9:42)


In chapter nine verse forty-one of the Gospel of Mark, the language used is, “Uncharacteristic” of the author of the Gospel of Mark.


The words, “Christ” and “Reward,” just don’t sit well in the same verse:


For whosoever shall give you a cup of water to drink in my name, because ye belong to Christ, verily I say unto you, he shall not lose his reward. (Mark:9:41)


Verse forty-two chapter nine of the Gospel of Mark, however, seems to pick up perfectly where verse thirty-seven chapter nine of the Gospel of Mark left off:


Whosoever shall receive one of such children in my name, receiveth me: and whosoever shall receive me, receiveth not me, but him that sent me. (Mark:9:37)


And whosoever shall offend one of these little ones that believe in me, it is better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he were cast into the sea. (Mark:9:42)


The only explanation is if some scribe or whoever, added verse forty-one of chapter nine to the Gospel of Mark, after its original publication…


Matthew


But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea. (Matthew:18:6)


Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh! (Matthew:18:7)


The word, “Offenses” is not used once in the Gospel of Mark, but it is used once in the Gospel of Matthew and once in the Gospel of Luke.


Luke


Then said he unto the disciples, It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come! (Luke:17:1)


It were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea, than that he should offend one of these little ones. (Luke:17:2)


Is it just a coincidence that both the Gospels of Matthew and Luke have, “Offences and Millstones” in two verses each and the two verses they have in common are almost identical?!


The fact that the author of the Gospel of Luke used the, “Offences and Millstone” verses in chapter seventeen instead of chapter nine with the rest of the stories that the Gospel of Luke have in common with the Gospels of Mark and Matthew explains why verses thirty-eight through forty-one of the Gospel of Mark seem, “Out if Place.”


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