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If Thou Wilt


And he preached in their synagogues throughout all Galilee, and cast out devils. (Mark:1:39)


And there came a leper to him, beseeching him, and kneeling down to him, and saying unto him, If thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. (Mark:1:40)


And Jesus, moved with compassion, put forth his hand, and touched him, and saith unto him, I will; be thou clean. (Mark:1:41)


Compassion — to have the bowels yearn that is (figuratively) feel sympathy to pity: — have (be moved with) compassion.


And as soon as he had spoken, immediately the leprosy departed from him, and he was cleansed. (Mark:1:42)


And he straitly charged him, and forthwith sent him away; (Mark:1:43)


Straitly Charged — much (in any respect) or (plural) many; often mostly largely: — abundant + altogether common + far (passed spent) (+ be of a) great (age deal -ly while) long many much oft (-en [-times]) plenteous sore straitly; (to snort with anger); to have indignation on that is (transitively) to blame (intransitively) to sigh with chagrin (specifically) to sternly enjoin: — straitly charge groan murmur against.


In verse forty-one, above, it reads, “And Jesus, moved with compassion, put forth his hand, and touched him, and saith unto him, I will; be thou clean.”


Then in verse forty-three it reads, “And he straitly charged him, and forthwith sent him away.”


Take a look at the meanings of the word compassion and the phrase straitly charged.


Is it even possible to have compassion for someone one second then straitly charge them a second later?!


And saith unto him, See thou say nothing to any man: but go thy way, shew thyself to the priest, and offer for thy cleansing those things which Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them. (Mark:1:44)


In the Gospel of Mark, the author portrays the character Jesus as a person who, “Adhered to the Mosaic Law.”


But he went out, and began to publish it much, and to blaze abroad the matter, insomuch that Jesus could no more openly enter into the city, but was without in desert places: and they came to him from every quarter. (Mark:1:45)


Matthew


And, behold, there came a leper and worshipped him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. (Matthew:8:2)


And Jesus put forth his hand, and touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean. And immediately his leprosy was cleansed. (Matthew:8:3)


Leprosy — (to peel); a flake: — scale; scaliness that is leprosy.


In the Gospel of Mark:


And Jesus, moved with compassion, put forth his hand, and touched him, and saith unto him, I will; be thou clean. (Mark:1:41)


And he straitly charged him, and forthwith sent him away; (Mark:1:43)


And Jesus saith unto him, See thou tell no man; but go thy way, shew thyself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them. (Matthew:8:4)


Moses — Of Hebrew origin; drawing out (of the {water}) that {is} rescued; Moseus Moses or Mouses (that is Mosheh) the Hebrew lawgiver.


In the Gospel of Mark:


And saith unto him, See thou say nothing to any man: but go thy way, shew thyself to the priest, and offer for thy cleansing those things which Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them. (Mark:1:44)


Verse four chapter eight of the Gospel of Matthew and verse forty-four chapter one of the Gospel of Mark are almost identical.


The phrase, “And offer the gift that Moses commanded,” is unique to the Gospel of Matthew which means, “Offer for thy cleansing those things which Moses commanded,” was not a “Gift” and the character Jesus probably didn’t say it was!


Luke


And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city, behold a man full of leprosy: who seeing Jesus fell on his face, and besought him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. (Luke:5:12)


And he put forth his hand, and touched him, saying, I will: be thou clean. And immediately the leprosy departed from him. (Luke:5:13)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And Jesus, moved with compassion, put forth his hand, and touched him, and saith unto him, I will; be thou clean. (Mark:1:41)


And he straitly charged him, and forthwith sent him away; (Mark:1:43)


In both, the Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Luke, the verses that correspond with verses forty-one and forty-three of chapter one of the Gospel of Mark are missing, because the author, “Authors” or “Authorities,” whoever edited the Synoptic Gospels during the, “Great Revision,” didn’t want the Son of God to appear “Angry.”


And he charged him to tell no man: but go, and shew thyself to the priest, and offer for thy cleansing, according as Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them. (Luke:5:14)


In the Gospel of Luke, the phrase, “He charged him to tell no man” is used, but without the word, “Straitly.”


Some modern-day scholars “Insist” that the, “Four Gospels” were written, “Strictly” from “Word of Mouth,” but that probably isn’t true.


There were several letters circulating many years before the first Gospel was ever written, which would completely explain the almost, “Word for Word” verses found throughout the Synoptic Gospels, like, the Gospel of Mark chapter one verse forty- four, which all three Gospels share.


But so much the more went there a fame abroad of him: and great multitudes came together to hear, and to be healed by him of their infirmities. (Luke:5:15)


Infirmities — feebleness (of body or mind); by implication malady; moral frailty: — disease infirmity sickness weakness.


And he withdrew himself into the wilderness, and prayed. (Luke:5:16)


The Gospel of Mark was the first of the four Gospels written about the life and times of the character Jesus.


The Gospel of Mark was written about 25 years before the Gospels of Matthew and Luke.


It portrayed the character Jesus as a man from Nazareth of Galilee who was chosen by God, baptized by John the Baptist and ran off into the wilderness to be tempted of Satan.


The author of the Gospel of Matthew, after hearing about this character Jesus and then reading the Gospel of Mark, decided that, “Something had to be done!”


No Jew in his right mind would believe that this character Jesus, a “Heathen,” whom, as it was reported, performed many miracles, came from Galilee.


So, the author of the Gospel of Matthew, “Created a Jewish Messiah.”


This character Jesus had disrupted the N.O.P., “Normal Operating Procedures.”


So, the author, “Authors” or “Authorities” of the Gospel of Luke, who must, somehow, “Restore Tradition,” wrote a Gospel of their own.


Enter, the “Jewish Prophet for the Multitudes!”


The reason I keep saying, “The Character Jesus” instead of just saying “Jesus,” is because in my mind, after finding out that the character Jesus wasn’t, “Born of a Virgin,” I feel as if I don’t know who Jesus was or is!

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