Search

Daughter of Jairus


And when Jesus was passed over again by ship unto the other side, much people gathered unto him: and he was nigh unto the sea. (Mark:5:21)


And, behold, there cometh one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name; and when he saw him, he fell at his feet, (Mark:5:22)


Jairus — Of Hebrew origin [H2971]; Jairus (that is Jair) an Israelite.

H2971 — enlightener; to be (causatively make) luminous (literally and metaphorically): — X break of {day} {glorious} {kindle} ({be} {en-} {give} show) light ({-en} {-ened}) set on {fire} shine; Jairus (that is Jair) an Israelite.


And besought him greatly, saying, My little daughter lieth at the point of death: I pray thee, come and lay thy hands on her, that she may be healed; and she shall live. (Mark:5:23)


Daughter — From G2364; a daughterling: — little (young) daughter.

G2364 — a female child or (by Hebraism) descendant (or inhabitant): — daughter.


And Jesus went with him; and much people followed him, and thronged him. (Mark:5:24)


And a certain woman, which had an issue of blood twelve years, (Mark:5:25)


In the Gospel of Mark chapter five verse twenty-five, the word, “Blood” has two reference numbers.

The meaning of the second reference number is what you would expect; blood literally (of men or animals) figuratively (the juice of grapes).


The meaning of the first reference number however, is surprising, to say the least.


Blood - the feminine the neuter and the present participle of G1510; being.

G1510 I exist (used only when emphatic): am have been X it is I was.


Reference number G1510 is also associated with the word, “They,” in verses fifteen and sixteen chapter four and the word, “Endure,” in verse seventeen chapter four of the Gospel of Mark.


They - (G1526) Third person plural present indicative of G1510; they are: agree are be dure X is were.

G1510 I exist (used only when emphatic): am have been X it is I was.

Endure (G1526) Third person plural present indicative of G1510; they are: agree are be dure X is were.

G1510 First person singular present indicative; a prolonged form of a primary and defective verb; I exist (used only when emphatic): am have been X it is I was.


According to the meanings found in the Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, some sort of “Life Form,” is in the blood of the woman with the issue of blood.


And had suffered many things of many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was nothing bettered, but rather grew worse, (Mark:5:26)


When she had heard of Jesus, came in the press behind, and touched his garment. (Mark:5:27)


Jesus — Jehovah-saved.


For she said, If I may touch but his clothes, I shall be whole. (Mark:5:28)


And straightway the fountain of her blood was dried up; and she felt in her body that she was healed of that plague. (Mark:5:29)


Fountain — a fount (literally or figuratively) that is source or supply (of water blood enjoyment) (not necessarily the original spring): — fountain well.

Blood – (G129) Of uncertain derivation; blood literally (of men or animals) figuratively (the juice of grapes) or specifically (the atoning blood of Christ); by implication bloodshed also kindred: — blood.


Four verses later, the word, “Blood” has only the one reference number. The one expected, G129.


And Jesus, immediately knowing in himself that virtue had gone out of him, turned him about in the press, and said, Who touched my clothes? (Mark:5:30)


Virtue — force (literally or figuratively); specifically miraculous power (usually by implication a miracle itself): — ability abundance.


The phrase, “Turned him about in the press, and said,” after the phrase, “And Jesus, immediately knowing in himself that virtue had gone out of him,” only makes sense if that which, “Knew that virtue had gone out of him,” was the “Spirit.”


And his disciples said unto him, Thou seest the multitude thronging thee, and sayest thou, Who touched me? (Mark:5:31)


And he looked round about to see her that had done this thing. (Mark:5:32)


But the woman fearing and trembling, knowing what was done in her, came and fell down before him, and told him all the truth. (Mark:5:33)


Truth — From G227; truth: — true X truly truth verity.

G227 — true (as not concealing): — true truly truth.


And he said unto her, Daughter, thy faith hath made thee whole; go in peace, and be whole of thy plague. (Mark:5:34)


While he yet spake, there came from the ruler of the synagogue’s house certain which said, Thy daughter is dead: why troublest thou the Master any further?(Mark:5:35)


Ruler — director of the synagogue services: — (chief) ruler of the synagogue.


As soon as Jesus heard the word that was spoken, he saith unto the ruler of the synagogue, Be not afraid, only believe. (Mark:5:36)


And he suffered no man to follow him, save Peter, and James, and John the brother of James. (Mark:5:37)


Peter — a (piece of) rock (larger than G3037); as a name Petrus an apostle.

G3037 — Apparently a primary word; a stone (literally or figuratively): — (mill- stumbling-) stone.

James — Graecized; heel catcher (that {is} supplanter).

John — Jehovah-favored.


And he cometh to the house of the ruler of the synagogue, and seeth the tumult, and them that wept and wailed greatly. (Mark:5:38)


Tumult — a disturbance: — tumult uproar.


And when he was come in, he saith unto them, Why make ye this ado, and weep? the damsel is not dead, but sleepeth. (Mark:5:39)


Ado — to be in tumult that is disturb clamor: — make ado (a noise) trouble self set on an uproar.


And they laughed him to scorn. But when he had put them all out, he taketh the father and the mother of the damsel, and them that were with him, and entereth in where the damsel was lying. (Mark:5:40)


And he took the damsel by the hand, and said unto her, Talitha cumi; which is, being interpreted, Damsel, I say unto thee, arise. (Mark:5:41)


Talitha — the fresh that is young girl.

Cumi — Of Chaldee origin [H6966]; cumi (that is rise!): — cumi.

H6966 — (Chaldee); corresponding to H6965: — {appoint} {establish} {make} raise up {self} (a-) rise ({up}) (make to) {stand} set (up).

H6965 — to rise.


And straightway the damsel arose, and walked; for she was of the age of twelve years. And they were astonished with a great astonishment. (Mark:5:42)


And he charged them straitly that no man should know it; and commanded that something should be given her to eat. (Mark:5:43)


Matthew


While he spake these things unto them, behold, there came a certain ruler, and worshipped him, saying, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live. (Matthew:9:18)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And, behold, there cometh one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name; and when he saw him, he fell at his feet, (Mark:5:22)


And besought him greatly, saying, My little daughter lieth at the point of death: I pray thee, come and lay thy hands on her, that she may be healed; and she shall live. (Mark:5:23)


In the Gospel of Mark, the daughter of the “Certain Ruler” isn’t dead, yet.


And Jesus arose, and followed him, and so did his disciples. (Matthew:9:19)


And, behold, a woman, which was diseased with an issue of blood twelve years, came behind him, and touched the hem of his garment: (Matthew:9:20)


Because the author of the Gospel of Matthew wrote that the daughter of a certain ruler was even now dead, it started to look like maybe the author of the Gospel of Matthew was referring to a different incident, but no, the woman with the issue of blood is proof enough that it’s the same account!


For she said within herself, If I may but touch his garment, I shall be whole. (Matthew:9:21)


But Jesus turned him about, and when he saw her, he said, Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour. (Matthew:9:22)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And Jesus, immediately knowing in himself that virtue had gone out of him, turned him about in the press, and said, Who touched my clothes? (Mark:5:30)


The phrase, “But Jesus turned him about, and when he saw her, he said, Daughter,” sounds a lot better than, “And Jesus, immediately knowing in himself that virtue had gone out of him, turned him about in the press,” although both versions sound weird.


And when Jesus came into the ruler’s house, and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise, (Matthew:9:23)


Minstrels — a flute player: — minstrel piper.


It’s hard to believe that the authors of the Gospels of Mark and Matthew are writing about the same event.


What’s even harder to believe is, the author of the Gospel of Matthew used the Gospel of Mark as a source.


In one story people are playing flutes and making noise; in the other:


And he cometh to the house of the ruler of the synagogue, and seeth the tumult, and them that wept and wailed greatly. (Mark:5:38)


He said unto them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn. (Matthew:9:24)


Again, it’s the same account; the phrase, “And they laughed him to scorn,” proves it….


But when the people were put forth, he went in, and took her by the hand, and the maid arose. (Matthew:9:25)


And the fame hereof went abroad into all that land. (Matthew:9:26)


Instead of “Straitly Charging them not to let any man know,” like in the Gospel of Mark, the author of the Gospel of Matthew wrote, “And the fame hereof went abroad into all that land,” totally opposite of what the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote!


The author of the Gospel of Matthew wrote the account with a lot less detail than did the author of the Gospel of Mark; the source, which is “Unusual” and breaks the “Pattern!”


Luke


And it came to pass, that, when Jesus was returned, the people gladly received him: for they were all waiting for him. (Luke:8:40)


And, behold, there came a man named Jairus, and he was a ruler of the synagogue: and he fell down at Jesus’ feet, and besought him that he would come into his house: (Luke:8:41)


The Gospel of Matthew doesn’t mention the name of the “Certain Ruler,” but the Gospels of Mark and Luke does?!


For he had one only daughter, about twelve years of age, and she lay a dying. But as he went the people thronged him. (Luke:8:42)


The author of the Gospel of Luke, in keeping with the “Agenda” of making the Gospel of Luke “Seem” more authentic, added the phrase, “For he had one only daughter.”


And a woman having an issue of blood twelve years, which had spent all her living upon physicians, neither could be healed of any, (Luke:8:43)


Came behind him, and touched the border of his garment: and immediately her issue of blood stanched. (Luke:8:44)


Stanched — (of the same meaning and used for it in certain tenses); to stand (transitively or intransitively) used in various applications (literally or figuratively): — abide appoint bring continue covenant establish hold up lay present set (up) stanch stand (by forth still up).


Stanched?! Someone chose the wrong word on this one!


And Jesus said, Who touched me? When all denied, Peter and they that were with him said, Master, the multitude throng thee and press thee, and sayest thou, Who touched me? (Luke:8:45)


In the Gospel of Mark:

And his disciples said unto him, Thou seest the multitude thronging thee, and sayest thou, Who touched me? (Mark:5:31)

In the Gospel of Matthew:


But Jesus turned him about, and when he saw her, he said, Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour. (Matthew:9:22)


In the Gospel of Matthew, the “Touch” isn’t addressed.


The author, “Authors” or “Authorities” of the Gospel of Luke wrote, “Peter and they that were with him said, Master, the multitude throng thee and press thee, and sayest thou, Who touched me!?”


And Jesus said, Somebody hath touched me: for I perceive that virtue is gone out of me. (Luke:8:46)


It is especially important to pay close attention to every word added, subtracted or changed in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke that differ from what was written in their source, the Gospel of Mark.


To make the Gospel of Luke “Seem” more authentic, the author “Taps Into the Emotional Nature of Humanity!”


If you haven’t already noticed, from this point on, pay close attention to the different “Moods” of the authors writings.


The Gospel of Mark is, “Straight Forward.” The author tells it like it is.


The Gospel of Matthew is, “Fire and Brimstone.” The author tells angry, dividing and condemning stories.


The Gospel of Luke is, “Cool, Calm, Calculated and Collected.” The author, “Authors” or “Authorities,” whoever wrote the Gospel of Luke tell, “Detailed, Emotionally Directed Stories.”


And when the woman saw that she was not hid, she came trembling, and falling down before him, she declared unto him before all the people for what cause she had touched him, and how she was healed immediately. (Luke:8:47)


In the Gospel of Mark:


But the woman fearing and trembling, knowing what was done in her, came and fell down before him, and told him all the truth. (Mark:5:33)


And he said unto her, Daughter, be of good comfort: thy faith hath made thee whole; go in peace. (Luke:8:48)


The character Jesus called the woman with the issue of blood, “Daughter” in all three of the Synoptic Gospels.


After going through all the scriptures in the King James Version of the Holy Bible and looking up the word, “Daughter” in the Strong’s Concordance, there is no apparent reason for the character Jesus to call the woman with the issue of blood for twelve years, “Daughter.”


In every instance, when the word, “Daughter” is used in the New Testament of the Holy Bible, it refers to the female child of a person.


Daughter (G2364) a female child or (by Hebraism) descendant (or inhabitant): daughter.


The only plausible explanation, considering the research only, is, the woman with the issue of blood is the character Jesus’, “Biological Child.”


The character Jesus was talking to his, “Baby Girl.


While he yet spake, there cometh one from the ruler of the synagogue’s house, saying to him, Thy daughter is dead; trouble not the Master. (Luke:8:49)


The word, “Master” is spelled with a capital “m” for no apparent reason which means it should be understood as the “Spirit” of.


But when Jesus heard it, he answered him, saying, Fear not: believe only, and she shall be made whole. (Luke:8:50)


And when he came into the house, he suffered no man to go in, save Peter, and James, and John, and the father and the mother of the maiden. (Luke:8:51)


And all wept, and bewailed her: but he said, Weep not; she is not dead, but sleepeth. (Luke:8:52)

And they laughed him to scorn, knowing that she was dead. (Luke:8:53)


In the Gospel of Mark, it reads, “And they laughed him to scorn.”


The author of the Gospel of Luke added the phrase, “Knowing that she was dead.”


And he put them all out, and took her by the hand, and called, saying, Maid, arise. (Luke:8:54)


Maid — a boy (as often beaten with impunity) or (by analogy) a girl and (generally) a child; specifically, a slave or servant (especially a minister to a king; and by eminence to God): — child maid (-en) (man) servant son young man.


The word, “Maid” is used six times in the New Testament of the Holy Bible; once in the Gospel of Mark; three times in the Gospel of Matthew and twice in the Gospel of Luke.


In the Gospel of Mark:


Maid (G3814) Feminine diminutive of G3816; a girl that is (specifically) a female slave or servant: bondmaid (-woman) damsel maid (-en).


In the Gospel of Matthew:


Maid (G2877) a maiden; a (little) girl: damsel maid.


In the Gospel of Luke:


Maid (G3816) Perhaps from G3817; a boy (as often beaten with impunity) or (by analogy) a girl and (generally) a child; specifically, a slave or servant (especially a minister to a king; and by eminence to God): child maid (-en) (man) servant son young man.


Using the “Pertinent Words and Names Method of Interpreting the Holy Bible,” looking up the word, “Maid” in the Strong’s Concordance under the reference number G3816, which correspond with the word “Maid” in verse fifty-four chapter eight of the Gospel of Luke, one is forced to ask the question, “Why did the author of the Gospel of Luke use the word “Maid” found under the reference number G3816, when clearly, any one of the other reference numbers would have “Made,” way more sense?!


Stupid mistakes like this one is the reason for phrases like, “The author, “Authors,” or “Authorities” and “Whoever Wrote the Gospel of Luke,” exists!


In chapter twenty-two verse fifty-six of the Gospel of Luke, whoever wrote that verse used one of the more appropriate reference numbers, G3814, which says that the, “Daughter of Jairus,” was a girl; not a boy….


But a certain maid, G3814, beheld him as he sat by the fire, and earnestly looked upon him, and said, This man was also with him. (Luke:22:56)


This is the second time in this chapter that the author, “Authors” or “Authorities,” used a strange word!


In the Gospel of Luke chapter eight verse forty-four the author or whoever, used the word, “Stanched” to describe the stopping of an issue of blood!


And her spirit came again, and she arose straightway: and he commanded to give her meat. (Luke:8:55)


And her parents were astonished: but he charged them that they should tell no man what was done. (Luke:8:56)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he charged them straitly that no man should know it; and commanded that something should be given her to eat. (Mark:5:43)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


And the fame hereof went abroad into all that land. (Matthew:9:26)


The “Pattern” is:


The author of the Gospel of Mark writes something, then the author of the Gospel of Matthew changes it in some way to make it, “Jewish” and the author of the Gospel of Luke then changes what the authors of Mark and Matthew wrote, some more to make it, “Universal” or “Catholic.”


This chapter seems to have changed “Patterns,” in that, the author, “Authors” or “Authorities” of the Gospel of Luke seem to be writing for the author of the Gospel of Mark, maybe even the Gospel of Matthew, also! There are several reasons for thinking this could be the case, here’s three.


In the Gospel of Mark:


And they came over unto the other side of the sea, into the country of the Gadarenes. (Mark:5:1)

In the Gospel of Matthew:


And when he was come to the other side into the country of the Gergesenes, there met him two possessed with devils, coming out of the tombs, exceeding fierce, so that no man might pass by that way. (Matthew:8:28)


In the Gospel of Luke:


And they arrived at the country of the Gadarenes, which is over against Galilee. (Luke:8:26)


If the author of the Gospel of Matthew used the Gospel of Mark as a source, why is where the character Jesus and his disciples landing in “Gergesenes” instead of “Gadarenes,” like in the Gospels of Mark and Luke?!


In the Gospel of Mark:


And when he was come out of the ship, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit, (Mark:5:2)


In the Gospel of Luke:


And when he went forth to land, there met him out of the city a certain man, which had devils long time, and ware no clothes, neither abode in any house, but in the tombs. (Luke:8:27)


If the author of the Gospel of Matthew used the Gospel of Mark as a source, why are there, “Two,” possessed with devils instead of “One,” like in the Gospels of Mark and Luke?!”


Finally, the author, “Authors” or “Authorities” whoever wrote the Gospel of Luke, with their, “Focus on a Future After the character Jesus,” which only came about after “Decades” where the character Jesus, “Had Not Returned,” as far as “They” knew, created a “New Chapter,” the “Acts of the Apostles” or the Book of Acts.


Starring in the first half of the “New Chapter,” the characters Peter, James, and John, who, out of necessity, had to be “Inserted” in strategic chapters of, “ALL FOUR GOSPELS.”


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he suffered no man to follow him, save Peter, and James, and John the brother of James. (Mark:5:37)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


But when the people were put forth, he went in, and took her by the hand, and the maid arose. (Matthew:9:25)


In the Gospel of Luke:


And when he came into the house, he suffered no man to go in, save Peter, and James, and John, and the father and the mother of the maiden. (Luke:8:51)


If the author of the Gospel of Matthew used the Gospel of Mark as a source, which is the “Prevailing Pattern,” why isn’t Peter, and James, and John the brother of James, mentioned in the Gospel of Matthew like in the Gospels of Mark and Luke?!


A better question is, “What better way to, “Discredit” the more popular Gospel, the Gospel of Matthew, than to “Agree More” with the first Gospel written?!”

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

And he arose from thence, and cometh into the coasts of Judaea by the farther side of Jordan: and the people resort unto him again; and, as he was wont, he taught them again. (Mark:10:1) Resort - to j

For every one shall be salted with fire, and every sacrifice shall be salted with salt. (Mark:9:49) Salted – salt. Fire - A primary word; fire (literally or figuratively specifically lightning): - fie

And if thy hand offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter into life maimed, than having two hands to go into hell, into the fire that never shall be quenched: (Mark:9:43) Hell – a gorge