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Beware the Leaven


Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread, neither had they in the ship with them more than one loaf. (Mark:8:14)


And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and of the leaven of Herod. (Mark:8:15)


Leaven – Probably from G2204; ferment (as if boiling up): - leaven.

Ferment - incite or stir up (trouble or disorder); agitation and excitement among a group of people, typically concerning major change and leading to trouble or violence.


The phrase, “And of the leaven of Herod,” is unique to the Gospel of Mark.


During the research, using the “Pertinent Words and Phrases Method of Interpreting the Bible it was discovered that if a word, phrase or action is found to be unique to the Gospel of Mark, one of three things occurred:


1. A scribe added it during the coping process.

2. The author, “Authors” or “Authorities” of the Gospel of Luke added it during the, “Great Revision of the Synoptic Gospels.

3. The character Jesus probably said or did it.


And they reasoned among themselves, saying, It is because we have no bread. (Mark:8:16)


And when Jesus knew it, he saith unto them, Why reason ye, because ye have no bread? perceive ye not yet, neither understand? have ye your heart yet hardened? (Mark:8:17)


The phrase, “Perceive ye not yet, neither understand? have ye your heart yet hardened?” is unique to the Gospel of Mark, which means the character Jesus probably said it.


Having eyes, see ye not? and having ears, hear ye not? and do ye not remember? (Mark:8:18)


Remember - to exercise memory that is recollect; by implication to punish; also to rehearse: - make mention be mindful remember.


The phrase, “Having eyes, see ye not? and having ears, hear ye not,” is unique to the Gospel of Mark.


When I brake the five loaves among five thousand, how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? They say unto him, Twelve. (Mark:8:19)


And when the seven among four thousand, how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? And they said, Seven. (Mark:8:20)


And he said unto them, How is it that ye do not understand? (Mark:8:21)


The phrase, “How is it that ye do not understand,” is unique to the Gospel of Mark.



Matthew


In the Gospel of Mark:


Now the disciples had forgotten to take bread, neither had they in the ship with them more than one loaf. (Mark:8:14)


And when his disciples were come to the other side, they had forgotten to take bread. (Matthew:16:5)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And he charged them, saying, Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, and of the leaven of Herod. (Mark:8:15)


The phrase, “Pharisees, and of the leaven of Herod is found once in the New Testament, in the Gospel of Mark chapter eight verse fifteen which means the character Jesus probably said it.


Then Jesus said unto them, Take heed and beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees. (Matthew:16:6)


In the Gospel of Mark:


And they reasoned among themselves, saying, It is because we have no bread. (Mark:8:16)


And they reasoned among themselves, saying, It is because we have taken no bread. (Matthew:16:7)


The phrase, “It is because we have taken no bread,” in the Gospel of Matthew is different from the phrase,” It is because we have no bread,” in the Gospel of Mark.


In the Gospel of Mark:


And when Jesus knew it, he saith unto them, Why reason ye, because ye have no bread? perceive ye not yet, neither understand? have ye your heart yet hardened? (Mark:8:17)


Which when Jesus perceived, he said unto them, O ye of little faith, why reason ye among yourselves, because ye have brought no bread? (Matthew:16:8)


The phrase, “He said unto them, O ye of little faith,” is unique to the Gospel of Matthew which means the character Jesus probably didn’t say it.


In the Gospel of Mark:


Having eyes, see ye not? and having ears, hear ye not? and do ye not remember? (Mark:8:18)


In verse eighteen chapter eight, the author of the Gospel of Mark, “Fires Off,” three questions in a row:


1. Having eyes, see ye not?

2. Having ears, hear ye not?

3. Do ye not remember?


For an author who used the Gospel of Mark as a source and frequently changed what the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote, the phrase, “Do ye not remember,” would present an “Irresistible Opportunity” to throw in the “Feeding of the Four Thousand Story,” which seems a little, “Fishy!”


Take away verse twenty chapter eight of the Gospel of Mark. This is what we get:


And when Jesus knew it, he saith unto them, Why reason ye, because ye have no bread? perceive ye not yet, neither understand? have ye your heart yet hardened? (Mark:8:17)


Having eyes, see ye not? and having ears, hear ye not? and do ye not remember? (Mark:8:18)


When I brake the five loaves among five thousand, how many baskets full of fragments took ye up? They say unto him, Twelve. (Mark:8:19)


And he said unto them, How is it that ye do not understand? (Mark:8:21)


Do ye not yet understand, neither remember the five loaves of the five thousand, and how many baskets ye took up? (Matthew:16:9)


The phrase, “The five loaves of the five thousand,” doesn’t make sense.


Neither the seven loaves of the four thousand, and how many baskets ye took up? (Matthew:16:10)


The phrase, “The seven loaves of the four thousand,” doesn’t make sense either.


How is it that ye do not understand that I spake it not to you concerning bread, that ye should beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees?(Matthew:16:11)


Then understood they how that he bade them not beware of the leaven of bread, but of the doctrine of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees. (Matthew:16:12)


The author of the Gospel of Matthew, just went on ahead and gave the audience a “Simple Answer” to the “Parable of the Leaven:”


The simple answer of the author of the Gospel of Matthew is to simply, “Beware the “Doctrine” of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees?!”


Beware the Leaven of the Gospels!


Luke


In the meantime, when there were gathered together an innumerable multitude of people, insomuch that they trode one upon another, he began to say unto his disciples first of all, Beware ye of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy. (Luke:12:1)


Trod - to trample down; figuratively to reject with disdain: - trample tread (down underfoot).


The author of the Gospel of Luke has nothing to say about, “Feeding the Five Thousand,” the character Jesus, “Walking on the Sea,” “What Defiles a Man,” “Dogs Under the Table,” the “Deaf and Dumb Man Speaks” or the “Sign from Heaven,” but does have something to say about, “Beware the Leaven;” in a totally unrelated chapter: Chapter Twelve….


The author of the Gospel of Luke chose not to write about the feeding of the four thousand with the seven loaves of bread and few fishes but chose to write about the “Leaven” of only the Pharisees, which is, not the leaven of the Pharisees and of Herod, like in the Gospel of Mark or the “Doctrine” of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees, like in the Gospel of Matthew, but the leaven of the Pharisees, which is, “Hypocrisy!”


What’s interesting about the word, “Leaven” and the name, “Herod” is the fact that in the Gospel of Mark, the two are together, in the same sentence.


It’s interesting because, “Herod” is a hero and the reference number G1491, means heroic.


If we dig deeper into the meaning of the word, “Herod,” something even more interesting occurs:


G1491 – From G1492; a view that is form (literally or figuratively): - appearance fashion shape sight.


G1492 - properly to see (literally or figuratively); by implication (in the perfect only) to know: - be aware.


The word, “Herod” which means hero or heroic, turns into a view that is form (literally or figuratively): - appearance fashion shape sight and then into; properly to see (literally or figuratively); by implication (in the perfect only) to know: - be aware!


With that said, whenever the word, “Herod” shows up in scripture, that’s a signal to take a closer look at what’s being written.


In the Hebrew language, the word, “Leaven” is from H7604; barm or yeast cake (as swelling by fermentation).


H7604 - properly to swell {up} that {is} be (causatively make) redundant.


Leaven was a sort of “Yeast,” which makes sense!


It’s why the disciples of the character Jesus thought the character Jesus was talking about bread when he said, “Take heed, beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the leaven of Herod,” in the Gospel of Mark chapter eight verse fifteen.


The whole, “King Herod beheading John the Baptist Story” in chapter six of the Gospel of Mark doesn’t make any sense.


A hero, the meaning of the word “Herod,” beheading a person whose name means, “Jehovah-favored?! It just doesn’t make sense!


Here we are again, with “Herod and the Leaven!”


In the Greek language the word, “Leaven” means; ferment (as if boiling up).


Because of the definition found in the Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible under reference number G2219, the “True” meaning of the phrase, “Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees in the Gospel of Matthew chapter sixteen verse eleven and the “True” meaning of the phrase, “Beware ye of the leaven of the Pharisees,” in the Gospel of Luke chapter twelve verse one, is not:


Beware of the “Doctrine” of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees or “Hypocrisy” of the Pharisees, it is:

“Beware of the “Ferment” of the “Authors” and of the “Authorities!”


Ferment - incite or stir up (trouble or disorder); agitation and excitement among a group of people, typically concerning major change and leading to trouble or violence.


Beware of the “Leaven” of the Gospels!”

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