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Salt


For every one shall be salted with fire, and every sacrifice shall be salted with salt. (Mark:9:49)


Salted – salt.


Fire - A primary word; fire (literally or figuratively specifically lightning): - fiery fire.

Sacrifice - sacrifice (the act or the victim literally or figuratively).


Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his saltness, wherewith will ye season it? Have salt in yourselves, and have peace one with another. (Mark:9:50)


Salt – salt; figuratively prudence: - salt.

Prudence - the quality of being prudent; cautiousness.

Good - properly beautiful but chiefly (figuratively) good (literally or morally) that is valuable or virtuous.

Season – to prepare that is spice (with stimulating condiments): - season.


Matthew


Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. (Matthew:5:11)


Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you. (Matthew:5:12)


Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men. (Matthew:5:13)


Lost his savor - From G3474; to become insipid; figuratively to make (passively act) as a simpleton: - become fool make foolish lose savor.

G3474 - dull or stupid (as if shut up) that is heedless (morally) blockhead (apparently) absurd: - fool (-ish X -ishness).


Luke


So likewise, whosoever he be of you that forsaketh not all that he hath, he cannot be my disciple. (Luke:14:33)


Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned? (Luke:14:34)


It is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill; but men cast it out. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. (Luke:14:35)


Both the authors of the Gospels of Matthew and Luke deviated from the chapters they have in common with chapter nine of the Gospel of Mark, which means that the, “Salt Parable” is something that the character Jesus probably said.


Because neither the author of the Gospel of Matthew, nor the author of the Gospel of Luke, could make sense of the “Salt Parable,” they both used it in different stories.


The authors of the Gospels of Matthew and Luke changed the same word to the same word; In the phrase, “But if the salt have lost his saltness.”


They both changed the word, “Saltness” to “Savor” and instead of the phrase, “Have salt in yourselves, and have peace one with another,” they both used some variation of, “It is thenceforth good for nothing.


In the Gospel of Mark:


Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his saltness, wherewith will ye season it? Have salt in yourselves, and have peace one with another. (Mark:9:50)


In the Gospel of Matthew:


Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men. (Matthew:5:13)


In the Gospel of Luke:


Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned? (Luke:14:34)


It is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill; but men cast it out. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. (Luke:14:35)


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